Adrian on CBC TV, a Podcast and YouTube

Apologies for the extended absence. It was a busy summer, as parents the world over understand. We managed to do some car-free camping on Saltspring Island and the kids attended three different summer camps concurrently, walking and aqua-busing their own way to each. It was a good time for building independence, as summer break should be.

In the midst of that, it was also a busy time for various 5K1C media opportunities. So I thought I’d paste a few of the more notable ones here.

I was most excited when I was contacted by Jennifer Keesmaat, Chief Planner for the City of Toronto. Jennifer is a bit of a hero of mine, with her progressive views on city planning and the cool projects coming out of Toronto these days (Railway Park being one of them).

On the side, Jennifer has started a widely heard urbanism podcast series called Invisible City. It’s featured some pretty great guests, including Larry Beasley. So when she asked me on as a guest, I jumped at the chance.

You can listen the full Invisible Cities episode below:

Around the same time, CBC TV’s Toronto-based “On The Money” business program invited me to discuss the “why” of urban family life with host Peter Armstrong. I’ve done live TV before, but I don’t believe I’ve ever done a remote (where you just stare into the camera and pretend you can see the host across the other side of the country).

In the five minute long piece, I stress the importance of showing our kids a better way of life, living sustainably and the difference between Standard of Living and Quality of Life (our parents had the former, but my generation and the next are aiming for the latter).

Check out the CBC interview below:

Also in the summer, Steve Saretsky, a local realtor who has built a reputation for his candid, illuminating and often contrarian views of the local market, asked me to sit down with him for a video interview about small living, sustainability, urbanism and my typical fetishes.

Steve’s had some great guests, such as Ian Young, Tom Davidoff and David Eby, so I was grateful to be included in such company. That I’d be invited at all is probably due to my fairly outspoken twitter presence (check that out, if you haven’t already – I’m quite active on that platform).

It wound up being a fun interview, so have a watch:

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Adrian Crook is a father of five living in beautiful downtown Vancouver, Canada. When he's not mobbed by his brood, he runs a successful videogame design consulting business.
  • jalal

    good jop

    wtn24.net

  • Cathy Smith

    I am sure you are happy but coming from Texas, all I can do is shake my head. The view is just buildings and not very pretty ones at that. I get the minimalist thing but just some curtains could soften it and make it look more homey looking like a way to just warehouse people. Where do the kids get to run off some of their energy daily? Where can they kick off their shoes and feel the earth squishing between there toes. Sorry, it just looks like existing instead of living which men often think is AOK!! Do you have girls? Is there no where they can girly it up?

  • Cathy Smith

    Cathy Smith • a few seconds ago
    I am sure you are happy but coming from Texas, all I can do is shake my head. The view is just buildings and not very pretty ones at that. I get the minimalist thing but just some curtains could soften it and make it look more homey rather than looking like a way to just warehouse people. Where do the kids get to run off some of their energy daily? Where can they kick off their shoes and feel the earth squishing between their toes. Sorry, it just looks like existing instead of living which men often think is AOK!! Do you have girls? Is there no where they can girly it up?

    • I’ve lived in Texas before, so I get the contrast – believe me. :) Re the kids, we often walk 10km (6 miles) a day, in addition to swimming, biking, playing at the park and more. I’m willing to bet they get more physical exercise than virtually all kids who live in more auto-centric neighbourhoods. We are also surrounded by beaches, water, parks, trees… Vancouver’s downtown is pretty unique that way, with the largest urban park in North America (outside of NYC’s Central Park) within walking distance of us. Re “girly it up” – I’m not sure I get that. We have “Just Dance” parties, dye hair and do makeup, create in the art room… am I missing something?